NBA fans sound off on ‘one foul shot’ rule change in G League

Nick Schwartz | USA TODAY SPORTS

In an effort to speed up games in the G League, the NBA is introducing a wild new rule that will cut down the number of foul shots by awarding players multiple points for hitting a single attempt.

According to a report from ESPN, the G League will have players shoot a single foul shot, regardless of whether the shooting foul would have normally resulted in an and-1 opportunity, a two-shot foul or a three-shot foul. If a player hits their single shot, they’re awarded either one, two or three points, depending on the situation. For example, if a shooter is fouled behind the arc, he’d only need to hit one free throw to score three points. In the final two minutes of the fourth quarter and overtime periods, the foul shot format will revert to the traditional model.

The change should certainly accomplish the goal of improving the pace of play – but the impact to strategies involving intentional fouling, or the idea of a single foul shot being worth three points in some cases, has some fans revolting on Twitter.

Ron Artest Keeps It Real With Darius Miles and QRich

It’s Thursday and you know what that means: Knuckleheads with Quentin Richardson and Darius Miles is back for Episode 2. Ron Artest — aka “Ron Ron,” aka “Metta World Peace” — joins the fellas to talk about everything from growing up in Queens, to playing on one of the greatest AAU teams ever, to winning an NBA championship.

Ron keeps it real about growing up in the hood and explains why he is a true New Yorker at heart. He also discusses his two years at St. John’s before talking with Darius about what could have been if Darius hadn’t skipped college and instead played for the Red Storm.

Artest then divulges how upset he became after he accidentally broke Michael Jordan’s ribs the first time the two met. Funny enough, the same week he met MJ in summer league, Artest also knocked down a 14-year-old LeBron James when he drove in the paint.

The three then reminisce about Artest’s time with the Pacers, and why he thinks the Indiana team he was on with Reggie Miller and Jermaine O’Neal was the best he ever played for — and why he feels responsible for not getting Reggie a title.

Artest then talks about going from small-market teams to big-market teams and why he felt so mentally clear once he got to the Lakers. He then talks about winning the championship in 2010, and explains the feelings he had getting on the podium.

The show wraps up with the three men talking about New York, and Ron shares his thoughts on the Melo situation. Ron Artest, one of the toughest defenders to ever do it, is the focus of another can’t-miss episode.